A Look at Concierge Medicine in Atlanta

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The Choice for Primary Care

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]The field of medicine is undergoing many changes. The primary care doctor of days past is now overextended. Physicians are being forced to practice “more efficient,” assembly line medicine. It is now clear that patients are in need of a solution to the current state of outpatient medical care.

Although, one size does not fit all, concierge medicine, a.k.a. personalized medical care, is standing tall as an option for overcrowded offices and underserved patients. Concierge medicine is one of the fastest growing medical trends in Atlanta and the country.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]Concierge medicine is a revolutionary form of health care that provides patients with personalized, attentive, quality medical care in a low patient volume setting, with personal physician access 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. While most medical practices carry about 3,000 to 4,000 patients per physician, concierge practices typically maintain about 600 patients per physician.

Concierge members can expect a dedicated internist who will address all concerns, same day or next day urgent appointments, coordination of care while traveling, personalized medical reports, and access to your personal physician via phone, email, and text messaging.

Concierge medicine or personalized medical care is a healthcare system in which the physician understands that you are the client, not just the patient. The physician listens to what you have to say, answers your questions, and is not satisfied until you are satisfied. The physician understands the meaning of combining quality medical care, compassion, and customer service to optimally respond to your healthcare needs.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]Buckhead Medicine is the premier concierge medical practice in Buckhead Atlanta. Our physician is Dr. Edward Espinosa D.O., M.P.H., a board certified internal medicine physician. Our mission is to deliver superior outpatient medical care to the North Atlanta community with an emphasis on quality of care, facilitating access to care, and focusing on the patient as our client.

The annual membership to Buckhead Medicine offers several additional benefits that distinguish the practice not only from traditional internal medicine practices, but more specifically from other concierge practices. A few examples are:[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Dr. Espinosa sees patients while hospitalized and will assist in coordination of care.

– Dr. Espinosa is on staff at Piedmont, Northside & Emory at St. Joseph’s Hospitals

– Dr. Espinosa provides house calls.

– Our practice maintains a patient to physician ratio of 400:1 compared to other concierge practices’ ratios of 600:1[/fusion_text][fusion_text]We believe the concierge medicine model allows for the development of a strong personal patient-doctor relationship that can lead to an overall improvement in how healthcare is delivered and may ultimately improve clinical outcomes.[/fusion_text][/one_full][button link=”#” color=”default” size=”” stretch=”” type=”” shape=”” target=”_self” title=”” gradient_colors=”|” gradient_hover_colors=”|” accent_color=”” accent_hover_color=”” bevel_color=”” border_width=”” icon=”” icon_position=”left” icon_divider=”no” modal=”” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”1″ animation_offset=”” alignment=”center” class=”footer-button modal-trigger-one” id=””]Request Quote[/button]

The Ultimate Guide to Living Healthy

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Ready to Start Living Healthy in 2017?

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]The goal of this post is to provide a guideline for living healthy. We all struggle in implementing these lifestyle changes, but keep in mind that small steps in the right direction will produce results. As always, discuss with your doctor before implementing these recommendations.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Consume a Heart Healthy Diet

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Limit your total daily calories to maintain a desirable weight. Your goal should be a BMI of 21-25 kg/m2. BMI = (Weight in Pounds / (Height in inches x Height in inches)) x 703

– Don’t skip breakfast. Use moderate portions. Avoid eating after 8pm.

– Drink at least 8 glasses of water daily, about 64 ounces. If you have heart or kidney problems talk to your doctor first.

– Drink 2 cups daily of fat free or low fat milk, or equivalent milk products.

– Most fats should come from sources of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids like fish, nuts, and vegetable oils (olive, canola, peanut, soybean, sunflower, safflower, and corn). Keep trans- fatty acids (partially hydrogenated vegetable oil shortening) consumption as low as possible. Total cholesterol intake should be no more than 300mg per day and total fat intake should be 20-53% of total daily calories. While saturated fat should be no more than 10% of total daily calories. Good sources of Omega 3 fatty acids are flaxseed, canola, soybean, walnuts, and fish oil capsules.

Living Healthy Fruits – Consume plenty of fiber, such as whole grains, fruits and choose a variety of fruit and vegetables each day. Be sure to select from all 5 vegetable subgroups: dark greens, orange, legumes, starchy vegetables, and other vegetables.

– Reduce intake of red meat, egg yolk, fried foods, and added sugars. Consume more fish (12 ounces/week), poultry, fruits (2 cups/day), vegetables (2 ½ cups/day) and whole grain products (3 or more ounces/day). When selecting and preparing meat, poultry, dry beans, milk and meat products, make choices that are lean, low fat, or fat free.

– When given a choice, select fish over red meat. The safest fish are flounder, farmed rainbow trout, sole, anchovies, and farmed clams and shrimp (low in Mercury and Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)). Other fish are fine to eat in moderation -once a week- such as: cod, farmed cat fish, mahi-mahi, wild salmon, tilapia, and canned tuna. Do not eat shark, swordfish, king mackerel, or tile fish as they contain high levels of mercury. The highest levels of PCB are found in farmed salmon and fish caught in local lakes and ponds.

– Limit salt intake to 2300-5000 mg of sodium per day (1-2 teaspoon of salt/day). Those who exercise heavily may need more. Keep in mind that non salty foods may contain large amounts of sodium. Increased salt intake can increase your blood pressure.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]To learn more about our Prostate Cancer Screen as part of our Personalized Medical Care click here.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Benefit of Vegetables

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Limit your total daily calories to maintain a desirable weight. Your goal should be a BMI of 21-25 kg/m2. BMI = (Weight in Pounds / (Height in inches x Height in inches)) x 703

– Don’t skip breakfast. Use moderate portions. Avoid eating after 8pm.

– Drink at least 8 glasses of water daily, about 64 ounces. If you have heart or kidney problems talk to your doctor first.

– Drink 2 cups daily of fat free or low fat milk, or equivalent milk products.

– Most fats should come from sources of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids like fish, nuts, and vegetable oils (olive, canola, peanut, soybean, sunflower, safflower, and corn). Keep trans- fatty acids (partially hydrogenated vegetable oil shortening) consumption as low as possible. Total cholesterol intake should be no more than 300mg per day and total fat intake should be 20-53% of total daily calories. While saturated fat should be no more than 10% of total daily calories. Good sources of Omega 3 fatty acids are flaxseed, canola, soybean, walnuts, and fish oil capsules.

– Consume plenty of fiber, such as whole grains, fruits and choose a variety of fruit and vegetables each day. Be sure to select from all 5 vegetable subgroups: dark greens, orange, legumes, starchy vegetables, and other vegetables.

– Reduce intake of red meat, egg yolk, fried foods, and added sugars. Consume more fish (12 ounces/week), poultry, fruits (2 cups/day), vegetables (2 ½ cups/day) and whole grain products (3 or more ounces/day). When selecting and preparing meat, poultry, dry beans, milk and meat products, make choices that are lean, low fat, or fat free.

– When given a choice, select fish over red meat. The safest fish are flounder, farmed rainbow trout, sole, anchovies, and farmed clams and shrimp (low in Mercury and Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)). Other fish are fine to eat in moderation -once a week- such as: cod, farmed cat fish, mahi-mahi, wild salmon, tilapia, and canned tuna. Do not eat shark, swordfish, king mackerel, or tile fish as they contain high levels of mercury. The highest levels of PCB are found in farmed salmon and fish caught in local lakes and ponds.

– Limit salt intake to 2300-5000 mg of sodium per day (1-2 teaspoon of salt/day). Those who exercise heavily may need more. Keep in mind that non salty foods may contain large amounts of sodium. Increased salt intake can increase your blood pressure.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Exercise Regularly

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]Living Healthy Exercise – Engage daily in 30-60 minutes of physical activity that is moderate in intensity. Daily exercise can be broken up into 2 sessions.

– Start gradually. Stop and discuss with your doctor if you have pain.

– Achieve physical fitness by including cardiovascular conditioning, stretching exercises for flexibility, and resistance exercises for muscle strength and endurance.

– Please consult your physician prior to starting any exercise program.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Use Alcohol in Moderation

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Alcohol intake should not exceed 2 drinks per day for men and 1 drink per day for women. Keep in mind that 1 drink is equivalent to 1 oz. of alcohol or 12 oz. of beer. Alcohol intake should be reduced if you have hypertension or other chronic medical problems.

– Alcohol should not be consumed by pregnant and lactating women, children and adolescents, individuals taking medications that could interact with alcohol and those engaging in activities that require attention, skill or coordination, such as driving or operating machinery.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Reduce Stress

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Avoid stressful situations and learn new ways to cope with stress.

– Yoga and meditation are excellent options.

– Marry someone you love. Evidence shows that health and lifespan is improved by being in a committed relationship.

– Consider getting a pet.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Maintain Preventative Health

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Check your cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar routinely and take appropriate actions if elevated. If abnormal, lifestyle modification or medications may be appropriate to prevent complications.

– Influenza vaccine: Annual flu vaccine is recommended for people over 6 months of age.

– Pneumonia vaccine: Two pneumococcal vaccines, PCV13 and PPSV23, are recommended for people over 65 years of age. For people less than 65 years of age with chronic medical conditions or who smoke, a single PPSV23 vaccine is recommended.

– Tetanus vaccine: Tetanus vaccine every 10 years and pertussis vaccine added to Tetanus once as an adult.

– Prostate cancer screening: Initiate prostate cancer screening discussions with your primary care physician at age 50, continue screening until age 75. If African American, begin discussion at age 45. Screening includes annual PSA and digital rectal exam. See your doctor if you are having urinary problems.

– Pelvic exam and Pap smear: Screening has become controversial and is no longer advised annually for routine screening. Discuss with your OB/GYN for the most up to date recommendations.

– STD’s: Be screened for STD’s if you are sexually active, especially between the ages of 15 to 29. Hepatitis C and HIV screening is recommended for people at high risk.

– Mammography: Every 2 to 3 years for women over 40 and annually for women over 50 to age 75. Women, know your breasts, perform breast self exams monthly. Notify your physician if you detect an abnormality.

– Colon cancer screening: Begin screening for blood in the stool at age 40. Begin colonoscopy screening at age 50. If African American, begin colonoscopy screening at age 45. Be familiar with the color and shape of your stool. Notify your doctor if stool is black, bloody, consistently pencil thin, or you experience a major change from your bowel movement routine.

– Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA): If you have ever smoked, be screened once for AAA at the age of 65. If you have hypertension or a family history of AAA you may need to be screened sooner.

– Vision/Hearing: Periodic hearing and vision screening every 3 to 5 years, sooner if abnormality is noted.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Sleep

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Get adequate sleep, at least 6 to 7 hours nightly.

– Practice good sleep hygiene. The bed should only be used for sleep or sex.

– Melatonin supplementation may help with insomnia.

– Limit caffeine intake, especially after 12 noon.

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Quite Smoking

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- When trying to quit, talk to your doctor, you don’t have to do this alone.

– Medications are available to help you quit.

– Evidence shows that repeated attempts at quitting inceases likelihood of success. If you don’t succeede the first time, try, try, again.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Focus on Safety

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Always wear seat belts while driving a car.

– Always wear helmets while riding a bike.

– Do not drive after drinking.

– If you own a pool, make sure it is fenced.

– Learn to swim.

– Wear plenty of sunscreen to prevent sunburn.

– Install smoke detectors in the home and change batteries twice yearly. The best smoke detectors are those that are both photoelectric and ionization.

– Keep water heaters under 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

– Do not keep fire arms at home. If you do, ensure fire arms are locked and secure.

– Practice safe sex.

– Do not engage in illegal drug use.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]

Wear plenty of sunscreen to prevent sunburns

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Be Emotionally Aware

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]- Be an optimist. A pessimistic style of living is associated with increased death rate.

– Have faith in God or consider other spiritual practices.

– Be honest with others and yourself.

– Control your anger.

– Love your family.

– Help others in need.

– Always guide actions towards others by love, righteousness, and equality.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]I hope you enjoyed the Ultimate Guide to Living Health! At Buckhead Medicine in Atlanta, our goal is to help our patients live the happiest, healthiest lives possible. Take the time in 2017 to focus on yourself by improving your health.[/fusion_text][/one_full][button link=”#” color=”default” size=”” stretch=”” type=”” shape=”” target=”_self” title=”” gradient_colors=”|” gradient_hover_colors=”|” accent_color=”” accent_hover_color=”” bevel_color=”” border_width=”” icon=”” icon_position=”left” icon_divider=”no” modal=”” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”1″ animation_offset=”” alignment=”center” class=”footer-button modal-trigger-one” id=””]Request Appointment[/button]

Prostate Cancer Screening: Should You Wear the Gown?

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Is Prostate Cancer Screening Right for Everyone?

[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]In honor of it being Movember I wanted to take a look at prostate cancer and the controversy surrounding prostate cancer screening.

prostate-cancer-screening-altantaProstate cancer is a common and frequent cause of death in males. In 2016, we expect the US to have 181,000 new prostate cancer diagnoses and approximately 26,100 prostate cancer deaths.

We screen for prostate cancer with digital rectal exams and the PSA blood test. Varied opinions and controversy exist regarding the digital rectal exam and PSA screening. Recommendations not only vary among physicians but also vary for prostate cancer screening among the American Urological Association, The United States Preventive Services Task Force, and the American Cancer Society.

PSA is controversial due to uncertainty as to whether the benefits of screening ultimately outweigh the risks of over diagnosis and over treatment.

The uncertainty lies in when and who to screen in order to reduce the number of patients that are found to be false positives, that is, the patient has an elevated PSA but no prostate cancer.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]To learn more about our Prostate Cancer Screen as part of our Personalized Medical Care click here.[/fusion_text][fusion_text]Elevated PSA levels frequently lead to prostate biopsy. Prostate biopsy can lead to complications such as serious infections, urologic complications, or bleeding.

It is clear that routine prostate cancer screening is not for everyone. In fact, most men who choose not to have PSA testing will not be diagnosed with prostate cancer and will die from some other cause. The reason for this is that prostate cancer often grows so slowly that most men die of other causes before the disease becomes clinically advanced.

What is also clear is that appropriate prostate cancer screening does save lives. Appropriate screening for patients at risk is beneficial, specifically screening patients with a family history of prostate cancer, African-American race, increasing age, PSA blood test that is higher than expected for one’s age, and a rising PSA blood test, even if the PSA level is within normal range.

Additionally, patients with symptoms should be screened. These symptoms include blood in the urine, slow or frequent urinary stream, painful urination, or pain or blood with ejaculation.

How do we screen for prostate cancer?

In the primary care setting we screen by asking questions about symptoms, digital rectal exam and the PSA blood test.

My recommendation is to have a clear discussion with your primary care physician in your early 40’s to identify your specific risk factors for prostate cancer. In general, schedule routine prostate cancer screening starting at age 45 for a baseline PSA level and then determine the need for yearly screening with digital rectal exam and PSA based on your specific risk factors.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]The best advice I can give to help clear the controversy is to spend time speaking with your primary care physician to identify risk factors or symptoms and develop a screening regimen that is right for you.

Part of our Personalized Medical Care membership includes a thorough annual exam and Dr. Espinosa helps monitor and recommend when prostate cancer screening in Atlanta is right for you.

Dr. Edward Espinosa, DO, MPH. Buckhead Medicine. www.buckheadmedicine.com.  678-855-0817[/fusion_text][/one_full][button link=”#” color=”default” size=”” stretch=”” type=”” shape=”” target=”_self” title=”” gradient_colors=”|” gradient_hover_colors=”|” accent_color=”” accent_hover_color=”” bevel_color=”” border_width=”” icon=”” icon_position=”left” icon_divider=”no” modal=”” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”1″ animation_offset=”” alignment=”center” class=”footer-button modal-trigger-one” id=””]Request Appointment[/button]

Importance of Breast Cancer Screening

breast-cancer-awareness-month

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Early Detection Saves Lives!

[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]breast-cancer-self-examOctober is breast cancer awareness month and with this in mind the importance of screening for breast cancer is front and center for many women. Breast cancer is the second deadliest cancer in women with 1 in 8 women being diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime. Worldwide, in 2013, we saw over 464,000 breast cancer deaths. Undoubtedly, this is an important health topic for women and one that generates some degree of anxiety.

It’s important to note that the majority of breast cancers in the United States are diagnosed as a result of an abnormal mammogram study, although a significant number are also first brought to the attention of a physician by a patient being aware of anatomic changes of her breast.

Differences in opinion surround breast cancer screening, however. Specifically, opinions vary with regard to who should be screened, when to start screening, how to screen, how frequently to screen and when to stop screening.

The concern from specialist is that if we over screen we may over biopsy, over diagnose, and maybe even over treat. “Overdoing it” carries its own psychological and physiologic side effects. In some cases, we may be looking at a “False-Positive”, i.e. looks like cancer but not cancer.

When considering breast cancer screening we should always include in the equation an individual woman’s risks of breast cancer, her personal preferences, and the benefits and harms of screening. The most important point being that women should make an informed decision with their physician about breast cancer screening.

While recommendations vary from specialty to specialty, I’d like to throw my hat into the ring and give you recommendations from a primary care, internal medicine physician viewpoint. Generally speaking these are my recommendations for breast cancer screening in women and for the most part coincide with recommendations from the American College of Radiology, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists and the American Cancer Society.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

1. Begin at 40

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]In average risk women, breast cancer screening should begin at age 40. Screening before age 40 is reserved for women at higher risk of breast cancer. High risk includes a positive family history of breast cancer, personal or family history of positive BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutation, or strong family history of ovarian, tubal or peritoneal cancer. Keep in mind that less than 1% of women in the general population are estimated to be at high risk for breast cancer.[/fusion_text][/one_full][two_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

2. Mammography is the Standard

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]The tried and true method for breast cancer screening and the current standard of care is mammography. Other options, including MRI of the breast are reserved for high-risk individuals or women with a history of breast cancer.[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”https://intrepy7493.wpengine.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Atlanta-mammogram.jpg” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”center center” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][/one_third][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

3. How Often You Get Screened Depends on Age

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]Screening should occur annually for women age 40 to 54 and then every two years for women 55 years of age and older.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

4. Screening Should Continue to 75-80

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]Screening should be continued as long as a woman has a life expectancy of at least 10 years. Most thought leaders recommend that screening for breast cancer should end around 75 to 80 years of age.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

5. Physician Breast Exams Matter of Opinion

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]As far as clinical breast exams performed by your physician in the office, these have fallen out of favor as they have the potential of false positive findings and no scientific evidence that these exams result in better outcomes. As a general rule I don’t recommend these unless a patient has identified an area of concern and would like further evaluation. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists does recommend clinical breast exams every one to three years for women ages 20 to 39, and annually thereafter.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

6. Cannot Rely on Self-Exams

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]With regard to breast self-exams performed at home, these exams have also fallen out of favor and generally are not recommended except for patients who are high risk. It is my experience however that the yearly breast self-exam assist women in self-awareness of anatomy and in many cases may be beneficial in identifying abnormal anatomy of the breast. Examples of concerning anatomic changes of the breast include: lumps, bumps, dimpling, changes in the appearance of the nipple, fluid leakage from the nipple, or skin changes or redness that do not go away.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

7. Genetic Testing is Helping

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]Genetic testing for breast cancer is indicated in very few women. When considering genetic testing, patients should work directly with a breast care specialist and undergo genetic counseling in order to make an informed decision. Specifically, women should consider genetic testing if they are diagnosed with breast cancer early in life, have a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer, are of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, or have a family history of male breast cancer.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]Appropriate breast cancer screening is our best defense in early identification of breast cancer. As in most cases, knowledge is power. Take time to discuss screening options with your physician in order to have a clear strategy for early detection.

Dr. Edward Espinosa, DO, MPH. Buckhead Medicine. www.buckheadmedicine.com.  678-855-0817[/fusion_text][/one_full][button link=”#” color=”default” size=”” stretch=”” type=”” shape=”” target=”_self” title=”” gradient_colors=”|” gradient_hover_colors=”|” accent_color=”” accent_hover_color=”” bevel_color=”” border_width=”” icon=”” icon_position=”left” icon_divider=”no” modal=”” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”1″ animation_offset=”” alignment=”center” class=”footer-button modal-trigger-one” id=””]Request Appointment[/button]